Merchant: ‘Fly the Blue’ the week of May 12-18

History of National Police Week:

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed Public Law 87-726 designating May 15 as Peace Officers’ Memorial Day, and the week in which May 15 falls as National Police Week. It has been said that President John F. Kennedy was also instrumental in supporting the “Code of Ethics” for law enforcement officers to follow. The law was amended by the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, signed by President Bill Clinton, directing that the flag of the United States be displayed at half-staff on all government buildings on May 15 each year. While the actual dates change from year to year, National Police Week is always the calendar week, beginning on Sunday, which includes May 15.

Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) promotes blue ribbons tied on car antennas as a reminder to the public that many law enforcement officers have paid the ultimate price and given their lives in the line of duty. It is also to honor those officers who, day and night, stand guard in our communities. Show your support for those fallen officers by flying a blue ribbon from your car antenna. Seeing blue ribbons flying from cars is a tremendous show of support for our fallen officers and those still working the streets. Each year, between 140 and 160 officers are killed in the line of duty and their families and co-workers are left to cope with the tragic loss.

The Brown County Sheriff’s Office would like to invite the public to help honor those who have lost their lives by displaying a blue ribbon on the antenna of your vehicle. Nationally, law enforcement is losing ground on the safety of our law enforcement officers and emergency personnel as well.

This year, we are asking that everyone be creative and display blue ribbons in support of the men and women in law enforcement. We will have blue ribbons available free of charge during the week of May 15 through 21 in the lobby at the Sheriff’s Office. I encourage everyone to pick up some of these ribbons and display them on your vehicle.

If you have any questions, please contact the Brown County Sheriff’s Office at 785-742-7125.

Law Enforcement Code Of Ethics

As a law enforcement officer, my fundamental duty is to serve the community; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and to respect the constitutional right of all to liberty, equality and justice.

I will keep my private life unsullied as an example to all and will behave in a manner that does not bring discredit to me or to my agency. I will maintain courageous calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my department. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.

I will never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, political beliefs, aspirations, animosities or friendships to influence my decisions. With no compromise for crime and with relentless prosecution of criminals, I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities.

I recognize the badge of my office as symbol of public faith, and I accept it as a public trust to be held so long as I am true to the ethics of police service. I will never engage in acts of corruption or bribery, nor will I condone such acts by other police officers. I will cooperate with all legally authorized agencies and their representatives in the pursuit of justice.

I know that I alone am responsible for my own standard of professional performance and will take every reasonable opportunity to enhance and improve my level of knowledge and competence.

I will constantly strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, dedicating myself before God to my chosen profession… law enforcement.

John Merchant22 Posts

John Merchant currently serves as Brown County (Kansas) Sheriff.

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